fundación
Charles Darwin
foundation

Biblioteca GT Corley Smith
GT Corley Smith Library
Vista normal Vista MARC Vista ISBD

First observation on the mating behaviour of the endangered scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini in the Tropical Eastern Pacific.

Por: Salinas de León, P.
Colaborador(es): Hoyos-Padilla, E. M | Pochet, F.
Tipo de material: materialTypeLabelArtículoMateria(s): Hammerhead shark | Tiburon martillo | Reproduction | Reproducción | ETP | Conservation | ConservaciónClasificación CDD: 597.31562 Recursos en línea: Haga clic para acceso en línea En: Environ Biol Fish (Sept 2017), Materia: Here we provide a detailed analysis of the first complete sequence of a mating event for the endangered scalloped hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini. This analysis is based on a mating event recorded at Isla del Coco National Park, Costa Rica, where large schools of hammerhead sharks are frequently encountered. S lewini mating sequence can be characterized by: (1) an open water encounter, (2) pre-copulatory biting, (3) grabbing of pectoral fin/copulation, (4) free fall, (5) separation and (6) following. Based on this single observation we found that only one male appears to be involved in a copulation cycle and that mating took place in a high current zone potentially to favor respiration when both individuals are unable to swim. This observation highlights the difficulty in observing mating behavior for this species since mating is likely to occur in open waters.
Etiquetas de esta biblioteca: No hay etiquetas de esta biblioteca para este título.

Here we provide a detailed analysis of the first complete sequence of a mating event for the endangered scalloped hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini. This analysis is based on a mating event recorded at Isla del Coco National Park, Costa Rica, where large schools of hammerhead sharks are frequently encountered. S lewini mating sequence can be characterized by: (1) an open water encounter, (2) pre-copulatory biting, (3) grabbing of pectoral fin/copulation, (4) free fall, (5) separation and (6) following. Based on this single observation we found that only one male appears to be involved in a copulation cycle and that mating took place in a high current zone potentially to favor respiration when both individuals are unable to swim. This observation highlights the difficulty in observing mating behavior for this species since mating is likely to occur in open waters.

English

2176

Con tecnología Koha